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"Afternoon Tee"
Arnold Palmer at the 1957 British Open
limited edition print
This is a limited edition of 1,000 black and white prints on archival paper.
Image size 21 1/2 x 25 3/4 inches
Outside 25 1/2 x 30 inches
$295 with free shipping

Call Joseph 256-435-6921with any concerns or questions

 

BACKGROUND

The 1960 Open Championship was played 6–9 July at the Old Course in St. Andrews, Scotland. Australian Kel Nagle prevailed over Arnold Palmer by a single stroke in a tournament that marked the emergence of the Open Championship as a major stop for American golfers.

Prior to the first round on Wednesday, the field was reduced from 147 to 74 in the 36-hole qualifier on Monday and Tuesday, played on the New and Old Courses. Palmer, who had won the U.S. Open three weeks earlier by erasing a seven-shot deficit in the final round, was four back after 54-holes. The final round on Friday afternoon was delayed until Saturday due to a heavy rainfall that flooded portions of the course; the first postponement in over fifty years. When play resumed the next day, Palmer and Nagle both went out in 34. Still four-strokes behind, Palmer began another charge on the back. He made up strokes on the 13th and 15th, made a 4 on the 17th, then made birdie at the last. Nagle was standing over a crucial par putt on the Road Hole 17th when he heard the roar signifying Palmer's birdie at 18. He managed to collect himself and hole the putt, then made a safe 4 at the last to win the title by a single shot over Palmer.

The British Open is a unique event and is of great importance to professionals and amateur golfers alike, as well as to fans of golf. Unlike the play of other majors—which are typically contested in sunny locales in the United States—the outcome of the British Open is often influenced by the weather. On a links course, morning and afternoon tee times can produce vastly different playing conditions, depending on the breeze that comes in off the sea. The weather is just one of the many unique features of the British Open that combine with its long history and prestigious reputation to make it an event unparalleled in golf.

Arnold Palmer never won the Open at St. Andrews, but his appearance in 1960 changed the game forever. He remembered how as a boy he read about Americans like Bobby Jones and Walter Hagen winning the British Open, and he saw winning one as important to his career. After Ben Hogan won that championship in 1953, few American professionals had traveled to play in The Open, due to its travel requirements, relatively small prize purses, and the style of its links courses

Before Palmer came over to play in 1960, the British Open had fallen off the radar of American professional golf. Just a year before, at Muirfield in 1959, no American golf pros were in the field. Their reasons were simple: It was far away and it wasn't that profitable, even if you won (the purse was $1,250 versus the U.S. Open's $14,400).

Palmer did win the Open Championship the next year 1961 at Royal Birkdale and again the following year at Royal Troon in 1962. Wherever Palmer went, American sports fans paid attention, so now everybody in the States knew about this historic championship played on dramatic seaside courses. American golf would never be so insular again.

Palmer was born in Latrobe, Pennsylvania. He learned golf from his father, Milfred (Deacon) Palmer who had suffered from polio at a young age and was head professional and greens keeper at Latrobe Country Club, allowing young Arnold to accompany his father as he maintained the course.

 

 

 

 

 

Afternoon Tee, is printed on acid free paper the old fashioned way..long before digital printing was the norm.

"Afternoon Tee"
Arnold Palmer at the 1957 British Open
limited edition print
This is a limited edition of 1,000 black and white prints on archival paper.
Image size 21 1/2 x 25 3/4 inches
Outside 25 1/2 x 30 inches
$295 with free shipping

Call Joseph 256-435-6921with any concerns or questions